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Debut performance of Men’s Acappella Chorus of Cache Valley a success!!!


Please click on the link to read the review above.

I am so impressed by my fellow singers in the Men’s Acappella Chorus of Cache Valley. Our debut performance was a great hurdle to get over. It helps us keep something driving us in our rehearsals. It is a milestone that needed to be reached.

Our acappella group has been so much fun for me. And other chorus members have expressed similar sentiments. They say how even if we don’t have many people asking us to perform that they have plenty of fun just in rehearsals. And I agree, it is a LOT of fun to get a group of men together and sing without any instrument accompaniment. When those chords lock in, it brings a tingle to your whole body. I’ve literally had goosebumps during some rehearsals. I hope the other chorus members know how appreciative I am of their dedication and their support.

I love hearing comments from audience members after a performance. I love seeing their faces as they say how much they enjoyed the performance. Their smiles when they describe how glad they are that we performed a specific song. Singing music is a service. While we do sing for the sheer enjoyment of singing ourselves. We also sing to share music with others. Music can change the outcome of a day. It can brighten attitudes. It can leave lasting impressions. It can motivate. And we love it when our music has touched those we share it with.

I am excited to start working on new material with the Men’s Acappella Chorus of Cache Valley (MACCV). We will begin preparing for Christmas concerts in December and we will also work a few new pieces to add to our repertoire.

Thanks again to those who attended our debut performance!

 

The Men’s Acappella Chorus of Cache Valley had their debut performance Sunday night, July 22 in the Kent Concert at USU.

Here is a link to the announcement we posted for this concert: http://bit.ly/KDUj5s

The performance went extremely well! From estimates given by USU Alumni Band members based on performances that last few weeks, we only expected around 30 people to show up. Add on the fact that the concert was moved from the lawn of the Quad on the east side of Old Main building to instead be held in the Kent Concert Hall, and it was actually surprising to see such a huge turn out. The Kent Concert Hall holds 2168 people, and we believe the venue was over half full if not 2/3 full. We were definitely very enthused to have such a large audience for our debut performance. And we are very appreciative to the…

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The Pit and the Pendulum, Part 2


Robert Baldwin, Music Director for the Salt Lake Symphony, Music Director for the Utah Philharmonia, and Director of Orchestral Activities at the University of Utah shares more of his thoughts on the importance of rhythm, meter, and tempo in music. He shares that music is not a perfect mathematical equation and neither is time in a musical piece. There is always ebb and flow. There is always adaptation, especially in live performances.

Before the Downbeat

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I’ll be climbing out of the pit after the last run of Susannah tonight.  It’s been a great experience, and full of potential for the pondering mind.  Inevitability.  Events that lead to something else.  The Grand Finale.  That incessant beat of the clock, metronome, and human heart; counting down to a predestined end.  Is this where we find meaningful rhythm and flow?  Or is it rather a stream into which we we enter, subdivide, and play?   Always present.  Welcoming us to participate.

The problem with the first example, is that it is too clinical, too easy.  In my experience it’s also completely wrong.  The thought that music, creativity, or life itself can be relegated to mere numbers is a popular misconception.  Yes, music is math.  Life is math.  Yes, proportions, ratios and relationships certainly exist.  But as human beings, our lives simply don’t operate this way.  Science is starting to…

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Rhythm in Music


Robert Baldwin, Music Director for the Salt Lake Symphony, Music Director for the Utah Philharmonia, and Director of Orchestral Activities at the University of Utah shares his thoughts on the importance of rhythm, meter, and tempo – an aspect of music often neglected when focusing on notes, pitches, timbre, sound quality, etc.

Dr. Craig Jessop, director of the American Festival Chorus, stresses this as well. Dr. Jessop uses “count singing” – a method he inherited from studying with Robert Shaw and the Robert Shaw Singers. This is where the notes are sung by singing “One, Two, Tee, Four”. This ensures the musicians keep an “inner pulse” going on inside their head when the time comes to put actual words to the music. It also helps musicians know exactly when notes are moving, beginning and ending of phrases, and note durations. Dr. Jessop swears by this practice.

Before the Downbeat

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I’ve emerged from the pit thinking about rhythm and tempo.  I’m there all week with the orchestra putting together Carlisle Floyd’s opera, Susannah.  There’s a lot that can go wrong on stage, and even more with this show as it includes live gunshots!  All in all, it was a good first rehearsal.  The only lingering issues are finding a consensus with rhythm and tempo.

Certainly, these are two things that are very important to my craft as a conductor.  Tempo control, metric organization and rhythmic precision are all something that is a great responsibility for all of us–the conductor, singer, and orchestra.  But behind all my admonishments to “watch the stick,” “play the subdivision correctly,” and  “don’t rush (or drag),” there is a deeper truth to the importance of flow and rhythm in the music.

“Time is like a superglue, keeping our story in order as we navigate the world…

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